twinset.us

Twins bound by a love of knitting talk about knitting and more.

Archive for November, 2012


Episode 6: Sticky and fuzzy…what’s not to love?

In which we discuss feasts, post holes, knitting on drugs, knitting in church, why worsted isn’t the worst, remind listeners about the contests deadlines at the end of the month, and have a listen to the Abby Franquemont interview from Rhinebeck.

Thanks to irocknits for the gift of the For Good hat pattern!

If you want a peek at the chicken coop at Fair Winds, check out the Google Maps photo.

Jan has started knitting some some socks while recovering from surgery – her Percosocks.  She hasn’t started a project page at the time these notes were written.

Ellen continues knitting on Rimfrost and a mystery knit.

Both twins were knittin’ bitten.  Jan missed the “at the same time” in her Knitmore Girls’ SPAKAL sweater, the Larch cardigan.  Ellen has a lunar eclipse in her version of Forestry which she is calling Blue Moons.

In Finely (or Finally!) Finished Knitting, Ellen whipped up an Overnight Hat to donate to charity.  She also finished the wristers that are part of the submission package for the Master Knitter Level II certificate.

Jan reports that ice cream making is much simpler than she recalled from our youth.  She used the Cuisinart ICE-21TQ Frozen Yogurt-Ice Cream & Sorbet Maker to make a cranberry lemon sorbet for their thanksgiving dinner.  She did not take Ellen’s advice to use the sorbet as an icepack for her surgical wounds.

Ellen spun us 360 degrees and reports on the Fiber Optic Gradient Rovings which she has finished spinning in a fine worsted singles.  Plying remains.  In Fiber Jargon, she discussed the difference between the yarns that worsted and woolen spinning produce, and why.

We get more spinning info from Abby Franquemont in an interview Jan recorded with her at Rhinebeck.

Ellen reports a slick trick for knitting garter stitch in the round without purling.  She found the trick on Fleegle’s Blog.

In Fashion Forecast, Jan predicts much laying down while she continues to recover from elective surgery, and Ellen mentions that she is taking a design class with The Glitter Knitter, Steven Berg, at his Minneapolis workshop, StevenBe.

How do YOU ponchini?

Dear Jan,

I spent a lovely day at StevenBe’s yesterday, taking part in a charity hat knit-a-long and getting an education in how to wear Steven’s hot pattern, the Eyelet Ponchini.

img_3759.jpg

.

.

.

.

.

.

Fashion forward folk will wear the ponchini so that it points at their latest footwear find.  Hot stuff!

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

But even the fashionistas have to face the Minnesota chill and can easily wrap their drape into a cowl, snuggled high on the neck or arranged in orderly folds to fill the gap in their coat.

stevenbecharityday.jpg

When it gets really chill, cover those ears by pulling up a hood.

img_3769.jpg

.

.

.

.

.

.

And as we approach spring (and yes, we will approach spring), convert to a stylish ascot by tucking the end through the loop.

.

.

.

Lisa and I didn’t come up with as many ways to wear the hats we knit.  Still, we are proud to add 3 hats to the pile that Hats for the Homeless is collecting.  I knit one; Lisa, that turbo-charged knitter, completed two.

img_3787.jpgMine is my Overnight Hat (free Ravelry pattern of my design) in Sandnes Garn Canto.  I modified a bit and cast on 60 sts instead of 54 for a bit more ease.

img_3780.jpg

Lisa’s is one she made up on the spot.  The plan is to get that pattern up for free on Ravelry in the near future.

Hoping to hear from you in the near future, too!

Love,

Ellen

Que Sera, Suri…

Whatever will be, will be…alpaca.  At least for this post.

Dear Jan,

As close readers/listeners of our blog/podcast are aware, you are a might bit infatuated with alpaca.  I’m not quite the fan you are, but in the right application, alpaca serves its purpose admirably.

And the best purpose I can think of for alpaca is to keep Wilson’s ears warm.

img_3675.jpg

Having a hollow fiber, alpaca is an excellent insulator.  Knit densely, it will block the wind; the dense knitting also provides needed structure to this fiber known more for its drape than it’s elasticity.   I knit this on size 2 needles using a 3-ply light worsted weight yarn, a 90:10 alpaca:wool blend from Velveteen Alpacas.

img_3673.jpg

The pattern is my own.  Getting the decrease ratio just right took some messing around, but I’m pretty happy with how it worked out in the end.  I plan to rework it in a slightly looser gauge to make it easier on the hands for knitting.  For more info on this incarnation of it, check out my project page on Ravelry – all the details you need if you’d care to work it out yourself before I get to it.

I finished the hat just in time.  Wilson wore it today; though we had 70 degree temps yesterday, today didn’t get above freezing.  It suddenly has me thinking of getting ready for winter.

Take care,

Ellen

P.S. Wilson looks mad in that shot, but he says he was just trying to look rugged and outdoorsy.

Episode 5 — Grateful Knitting

1-dsc06117-001.JPGIn which we love the number 5, talk of knitting retreats and fiber festivals, twin spin, learn about the best yarn for cables, find out that singles are singular, hear a Cat’s purr, count our blessings post-Hurricane, hear about a beloved knitting mentor and talk about loss including that of Judith MacKenzie’s studio, ask our listeners to support Hurrican survivors and help Judith get back on her feet and offer not one, but two contests!

Click HERE to listen!

Shhhh….(Shetland!)…

Dear Jan,

Can you blame me for being infatuated with Shetland wool when it is so darned beautiful?

I washed my 3 Shetland fleeces from Rhinebeck last weekend and they are dry and lovely now.  I spun up a lock of each using a light spindle – I couldn’t resist sampling.

shetland-fleece.jpg

My Thunder Hogget (a hogget is a young sheep and in particular the first fleece sheared from that sheep) is a calm brown color and is a fine fleece Shetland (only the fine wooly fiber in this fleece).

shetland-fleece2.jpg

Eleanor is a  dual-coated Shetland in a dark, dark, dare-I-say black espresso color.  Each lock contains both hairs and wool – I will have to learn some tricks for processing her fleece.  The sample yarn spun up in a true black for the hair and a very dark charcoal for the softer wool.

shetland-fleece1.jpg

And Puck, oh, Puck!, such a lovely combination of honey-colored lambs curls followed by a misty grey mature fleece.  Just like human babies, lambies can change coat color and this one wasn’t sheared before that happened.  The resulting yarn is grey flecked with golden brown.

These will keep me busy for quite a while.  (Shhh…there is another fleece that just arrived in the mail…)

Love,

Ellen